Puerto Rico 2024

38th Conference of Latin American Geography

Old San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 22-26, 2024

We are thrilled to announce the preliminary details about the 38th Conference of Latin American Geography (CLAG), to be held at el Cuartel de Ballajá & el Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña in Old San Juan, Puerto Rico on May 22-24, 2024. Additional field trips are scheduled for May 24 (afternoon), 25, & 26.

Registration deadline extended to March 15, 2024!!


Conference Registration

We expect participants to be a member of CLAG (annual membership cost is only $70 and includes our journal JLAG, and is discounted to $20 for students who are then also eligible for grants and awards) but have provided a non-member rate. A discount is offered to those in the 'Global South' who are currently based in institutions or are independent scholars in Latin America or the Caribbean.

In person attendance (includes refreshments, lunches, etc. Conference banquet is additional cost)

Early Registration Deadline: January 19, 2024
CLAG members: $200 ($50 discount for those based in 'Global South')
CLAG member Students: $125 ($50 discount for those based in 'Global South')
Non CLAG members or guests of participants who wish to attend conference: $225
Banquet/Conference dinner: $50

Late Registration Deadline: February 23, 2024 Extended to March 15, 2024!
CLAG members: $250 ($50 discount for those based in 'Global South')
CLAG member students: $150 ($50 discount for those based in 'Global South')
Non CLAG members or guests of participants who wish to attend conference: $250
Banquet/Conference dinner: $50

How to Register

Before registering for the CLAG meeting in San Juan, Puerto Rico, you must be a CLAG member. If you are a member, please login and then visit this registration page again. If you have never been a member, please join CLAG and then visit this registration page once you are logged in as a member.

Antes de registrarse para la reunión de CLAG en San Juan, Puerto Rico, debe ser miembro de CLAG. Si es miembro, inicie sesión y luego visite esta página de registro nuevamente. Si nunca ha sido miembro, únase a CLAG y luego visite esta página de registro una vez que han iniciado sesión como miembro.

Antes de se registrar para a reunião do CLAG em San Juan, Puerto Rico, você deve ser um membro do CLAG. Se você for um membro, faça o login e visite esta página de registro novamente. Se você nunca foi membro, associe-se ao CLAG e visite esta página de registro assim que estiver logado como membro.

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Submit an Abstract

Conference abstract submission is now open for Puerto Rico 2024. Please submit your abstract before February 23, 2024 March 15, 2024.

  1. Please submit abstracts with this google form.
  2. To upload your abstract, please follow the example below from a previous CLAG conference.

Example Abstract:

Kendra McSweeney
Department of Geography
The Ohio State University

FROM PORTRAIT TO LANDSCAPE: USING PHOTOGRAPHS TO ACCESS LOCAL PERCEPTIONS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE IN EASTERN HONDURAS

The success of local-outsider collaboration in managing biodiverse landscapes depends in large part on how much different groups’ perceptions of environmental change—its trajectory and the urgency of its mitigation—converge.  Recent research has questioned whether such convergence exists.  This paper examines how dissonance in perception of environmental change might arise from local peoples’ distinctive collective memories of past events, and their conceptualization of time more generally.  Research was conducted in eastern Honduras, where Tawahka Amerindians are working with national and international NGOs to manage a new Biosphere Reserve.  70-year old photographs of Tawahka ancestors were used to elicit local views of resource use change. Resultant discussions revealed surprising accounts of local history, and an unexpected view of the role that North Americans play as keepers of the landscape’s past.  Findings suggest that closer attention to local notions of long-term environmental change in conservation-and-development initiatives.

Keywords: environmental change, photographs in fieldwork, conservation and development, Tawahka, Honduras, Latin America.

Dates to remember:

  • February 23rd Regular Registration & Abstract Submission Deadline CLAG 2024
  • March 15 last day to submit abstracts CLAG 2024

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Organize a Session

If you want to organize a session, please use the CLAG listserve to make calls for papers.  Once you have a complete session (five papers total, or four papers and a discussant) please submit your session proposal using this google form. If you are not presenting in the session, please use "session organizer" as a placeholder for the presentation title and presentation abstract. Encourage your session participants to submit their abstracts as instructed here.

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CFPs for Organized Sessions

Several calls for papers are already circulating on CLAGnet and through the AAG LASG specialty group. This is a current list of existing CFPs. Please email the organizers for more information about each session.

  • Geographies of Amazonia: Dynamism in Landscapes & Livelihoods
    Co-organizers: David Seward Salisbury, Christian Abizaid, and Delaney Demaret.
    Climate change and deforestation are pushing the Amazon rainforest to a tipping point that could see the world’s largest rainforest transition to a tropical savannah in a matter of decades (Lovejoy & Nobre 2017, Walker 2021) despite this deforestation and forest degradation continue (Lapola et al., 2023). Local peoples, livelihoods, and landscapes are also experiencing accelerating change as economic forces, political regimes, and policy change influence even the most remote areas of the Amazon (Albert et al., 2023). The Geographies of Amazonia session invites empirical and theoretical papers that examine dynamism in Amazonian landscapes and livelihoods from any part of the Amazon. We welcome papers from different theoretical and methodological approaches.
  • Mobilities and International Migration in Latin America and the Caribbean
    Co-organizers: Brad Jokisch and Lindsey Carte.
    We are looking for papers that examine some aspect(s) of the multiple types of international migration and mobilities ongoing in Latin America and the Caribbean. In recent years migration within, to, and from Latin America has diversified to include new migrant-refugees, routes, and countries of destination and transit. The demographic profile of migrant-refugees traveling within and from LAC has expanded to include millions of children, families, and extra-regional migrants. This complex diversification has occurred as a humanitarian and political crisis foments not only on the U.S.-Mexico border, but also at numerous destinations in the U.S. and locations in LAC. Nation-states have vacillated between accommodating and rejecting refugees and migrants in transit, and the Biden Administration has implemented conflicting policies intended to manage the political dimensions of a large number of LAC migrants seeking asylum or to otherwise enter the United States. These migration patterns and the responses by state and non-state actors are creating tremendous social, economic, environmental, and political consequences for LAC and migrant-refugees attempting to navigate this complex landscape. The session hopes to highlight the many ways international migration is affecting LAC, including forms of international migration and mobilities that deserve more attention by geographers and other social scientists.
  • Mining and Extractivism in Latin America
    Co-organizers: Aaron Malone, Andrea Marston, and Matt Himley
    Geographers have been at the forefront of research integrating human and environmental facets of mining and extractivism. A global commodities boom beginning in the early 2000s drew interest as mining frontiers expanded, extraction deepened in long-standing mining regions, and conflicts proliferated, with social movements and diverse forms of resistance emerging across Latin America. The variety of impacts and challenges mirrors the diversity of expanded extraction, with everything from mega-mines to artisanal mining growing rapidly. More recently, the global push to transition to renewable energy systems has brought renewed focus to ‘critical minerals,’ and the realization that many low-carbon technologies are mineral intensive. Latin America plays a central role in the scramble for lithium, copper, nickel, rare earths, etc., with huge implications for the region’s peoples, landscapes, and future.
  • Emerging Research into Extractivism(s) in Guatemala
    Co-organizers: Catherine Nolin and Vaclav Masek
    The concentration of state power in Guatemala achieved through an alliance of corrupt authoritarian figures following extensive anti-corruption protests in 2015 has heightened the crisis of legitimacy within the framework of neoliberal democracy. This situation exacerbates the tension between Indigenous communities and industries involved in resource extraction. The alliance's ability to maintain control in elections, despite its lack of legitimacy and the unpopularity of its agenda, exposes the corruption inherent in the violent and exclusionary aspects of electoral democracy that are prevalent in impoverished and Indigenous areas. Here, the pursuit of extractive development aligns with violence and corruption, worsening the long-lasting consequences of historical colonial dispossession through the privatization and pollution of shared resources, particularly water systems. By dismantling the remaining democratic institutions and expanding extractive activities, the authoritarian consolidation deepens the fundamental contradictions in Guatemalan democracy. Democratic backsliding also conflicts with the growing political and environmental aspirations of Indigenous communities-–Maya, Xinka, and Garífuna peoples—emphasizing the need for coalitions supporting a multi-ethnic state and decolonized development. Rising Indigenous ecopolitics is building alliances across dividing lines of ethnicity, geography, and class. Creating unity among progressive organizations in this critical moment holds the historic potential to overcome legacies of violence and replace competitive authoritarianism democracy with plurinational assembly politics. This session highlights the new empirical and theoretical directions researchers are taking to examine the spatiality of extractivism’s impact across human and physical landscapes.
  • Political ecologies of Agriculture in Latin America
    Co-organizers: Adrienne Johnson, Zoe Pearson, and Case Watkins
    This in-person session will bring together papers that critically reflect on the relationalities, power inequities, biophysical processes, and/or political dynamics of agriculture in Latin America. Specifically, the session seeks to examine the cultural, social, political, environmental, and economic significance of agricultural practices—and the relations that surround such practices. We invite papers that make connections between past historical power structures and new directions in politics, policy-making, and governance. We are also interested in contributions that advance new theoretical understandings of agricultural landscape change in Latin America. We look forward to forging new connections and conversations.

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Conference Program

  • May 21 Informal Evening get together in Old San Juan
  • May 22-24 Conference Sessions CLAG 2024
  • May 23 Conference Banquet (evening)
  • May 24, 25, & 26 Field Trips CLAG 2024

Please stay tuned for more details ...

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Accommodations (no official conference hotel)

Hotels close to the Conference

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Field Trips

Friday, May 24

Urban Geography of Old San Juan

Friday May 24, 3pm - ~6pm - $20 ($10 for students, Puerto Riqueños, & global south) - register here

3-hour walking tour of Old San Juan that ends with a free drink at a local pub. Dr. Rafael Díaz (UPR Humacao) and Dr. Carlos Guilbe (UPR Rio Piedras) will lead this tour of the urban and historical geography, including gentrification, informal economies, and urban poverty of San Juan. Stops will include a diversity of barrios including La Perla.

Saturday, May 25

Climate Justice & Political Ecology of Puerto Rico’s Southern Coast

Saturday, May 25, 8am - ~6pm - $75 ($25 for students, Puerto Riqueños, & global south) - register here

10-hour day trip with private tour buses and lunch included. This tour led by Dr. Carlos Guilbe (UPR Rio Piedras) will cross the island (Cordillera Central) to the southern coast (Ponce and Guayama) to visit a coal-burning power plant, impacted landscapes, mangrove management areas, and food production sites, while exploring the south’s physical and historical geography through a climate justice & political ecology lens.

Agroecología en Puerto Rico: Finca El Josco Bravo en las Montañas de Toa Alta

Saturday, May 25, 8am - ~2pm - $45 ($15 for students, Puerto Riqueños, & global south) - register here

6 hour day trip led by Suley Cruz (Geographer, who works in El Josco Bravo) and Dr. Katia Aviles that will visit a community agriculture project to discuss issues of food security, agriculture capacity building, and gendered development. A lunch consisting of food from El Josco Bravo will be included.

Trains, Boats, and Buses: Tour of the Transportation Networks of the San Juan Metropolitan Area

Saturday, May 25, 10am - ~2pm - $30 ($15 for students, Puerto Riqueños, & global south) - register here

4-hour vuelta of the local transportation systems in the greater San Juan Metropolitan Area with lunch included. E. Nieves (Lecturer UPR Rio Piedras) will take interested folk on a geographic journey of the complex and dynamic peri-urban public transportation system with a stop for an authentic Puerto Rican lunch.

 

JLAG's Ten Most Popular Articles by Requests Since 2010

10057 Christopher Gaffney (2010).
Mega-events and socio-spatial dynamics in Rio de Janeiro, 1919-2016
Journal of Latin American Geography 9(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/377416

3837 Maria Elisa Christie (2002).
Naturaleza y sociedad desde la perspectiva de la cocina tradicional mexicana: género, adaptación y resistencia
Journal of Latin American Geography 1(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/215263

3479 Jeremy Slack; Daniel E. Martínez; Alison Elizabeth Lee; Scott Whiteford (2016).
The Geography of Border Militarization: Violence, Death and Health in Mexico and the United States
Journal of Latin American Geography 15(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/613266

3119 Karl H. Offen (2004).
The Territorial Turn: Making Black Territories in Pacific Colombia
Journal of Latin American Geography 2(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/174024

3102 Doribel Herrador Valencia; Enric Mendizábal Riera; Martí Boada i Juncà (2012).
Participatory Action Research Applied to the Management of Natural Areas: The Case Study of Cinquera in El Salvador
Journal of Latin American Geography 11(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/470629

2921 Jeffrey Todd Bury (2002).
Livelihoods, Mining and Peasant Protests in the Peruvian Andes
Journal of Latin American Geography 1(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/215262

2753 James Freeman (2014).
Raising the Flag over Rio de Janeiro's Favelas: Citizenship and Social Control in the Olympic City
Journal of Latin American Geography 13(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/539604

2507 Cynthia Sorrensen (2005).
Maria Full of Grace (Maria, llena eres de gracia) (review)
Journal of Latin American Geography 4(2). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/189742

2499 Kate Swanson; Rebecca Maria Torres (2016).
Child Migration and Transnationalized Violence in Central and North America
Journal of Latin American Geography 15(3). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/639098

2407 Dr. Rikke Schmidt Kjærgaard (2015).
The Case of the Green Turtle: An Uncensored History of a Conservation Icon by Alison Rieser (review)
Journal of Latin American Geography 14(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/578762

JLAG's Ten Most Popular Articles by Requests in 01/2024

610 Doribel Herrador Valencia; Enric Mendizábal Riera; Martí Boada i Juncà (2012).
Participatory Action Research Applied to the Management of Natural Areas: The Case Study of Cinquera in El Salvador
Journal of Latin American Geography 11(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/470629

312 Elizabeth Macpherson; Pía Weber Salazar; Paulo Urrutia Barceló (2023).
Los ríos como territorio en disputa: hacia un enfoque relacional del agua en Chile / Rivers as Disputed Territory: Towards a Relational Approach to Water in Chile
Journal of Latin American Geography 22(3). https://muse.jhu.edu/article/915673

214 Maria Elisa Christie (2002).
Naturaleza y sociedad desde la perspectiva de la cocina tradicional mexicana: género, adaptación y resistencia
Journal of Latin American Geography 1(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/215263

134 Martha G. Bell; Jessica Budds; Gabriela Valdivia; Jörn Seemann; John C. Finn; Eugenio Arima (2023).
Contested Conference Locations: Perspectives on the 2024 AAG and CLAG Meetings
Journal of Latin American Geography 22(3). https://muse.jhu.edu/article/915666

112 Karl H. Offen (2004).
The Territorial Turn: Making Black Territories in Pacific Colombia
Journal of Latin American Geography 2(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/174024

100 Christian Brannstrom Adryane Gorayeb (2022).
Geographical Implications of Brazil’s Emerging Green Hydrogen Sector
Journal of Latin American Geography 21(1). https://muse.jhu.edu/article/855961

76 Jessica Budds; Kathleen O'Reilly (2023).
Reforming Water Governance in Chile: A Hydrosocial Relations Perspective
Journal of Latin American Geography 22(3). https://muse.jhu.edu/article/915672

70 Christopher Gaffney; Bruno Eeckels (2020).
Covid-19 and Tourism Risk in the Americas
Journal of Latin American Geography 19(3). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/760914

64 Felix M. Dorn; Fernando Ruiz Peyré (2020).
Lithium as a Strategic Resource: Geopolitics, Industrialization, and Mining in Argentina
Journal of Latin American Geography 19(4). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/772602

56 Kathleen McAfee (2004).
Corn Culture and Dangerous DNA: Real and Imagined Consequences of Maize Transgene Flow in Oaxaca
Journal of Latin American Geography 2(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/174022

JLAG's Ten Most Popular Articles by Requests in 2024

610 Doribel Herrador Valencia; Enric Mendizábal Riera; Martí Boada i Juncà (2012).
Participatory Action Research Applied to the Management of Natural Areas: The Case Study of Cinquera in El Salvador
Journal of Latin American Geography 11(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/470629

312 Elizabeth Macpherson; Pía Weber Salazar; Paulo Urrutia Barceló (2023).
Los ríos como territorio en disputa: hacia un enfoque relacional del agua en Chile / Rivers as Disputed Territory: Towards a Relational Approach to Water in Chile
Journal of Latin American Geography 22(3). https://muse.jhu.edu/article/915673

214 Maria Elisa Christie (2002).
Naturaleza y sociedad desde la perspectiva de la cocina tradicional mexicana: género, adaptación y resistencia
Journal of Latin American Geography 1(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/215263

134 Martha G. Bell; Jessica Budds; Gabriela Valdivia; Jörn Seemann; John C. Finn; Eugenio Arima (2023).
Contested Conference Locations: Perspectives on the 2024 AAG and CLAG Meetings
Journal of Latin American Geography 22(3). https://muse.jhu.edu/article/915666

112 Karl H. Offen (2004).
The Territorial Turn: Making Black Territories in Pacific Colombia
Journal of Latin American Geography 2(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/174024

100 Christian Brannstrom Adryane Gorayeb (2022).
Geographical Implications of Brazil’s Emerging Green Hydrogen Sector
Journal of Latin American Geography 21(1). https://muse.jhu.edu/article/855961

76 Jessica Budds; Kathleen O'Reilly (2023).
Reforming Water Governance in Chile: A Hydrosocial Relations Perspective
Journal of Latin American Geography 22(3). https://muse.jhu.edu/article/915672

70 Christopher Gaffney; Bruno Eeckels (2020).
Covid-19 and Tourism Risk in the Americas
Journal of Latin American Geography 19(3). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/760914

64 Felix M. Dorn; Fernando Ruiz Peyré (2020).
Lithium as a Strategic Resource: Geopolitics, Industrialization, and Mining in Argentina
Journal of Latin American Geography 19(4). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/772602

56 Kathleen McAfee (2004).
Corn Culture and Dangerous DNA: Real and Imagined Consequences of Maize Transgene Flow in Oaxaca
Journal of Latin American Geography 2(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/174022

Los Diez Artículos Españoles Mas Popular de JLAG por Solicitudes Desde 2010

3837 Maria Elisa Christie (2002).
Naturaleza y sociedad desde la perspectiva de la cocina tradicional mexicana: género, adaptación y resistencia
Journal of Latin American Geography 1(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/215263

2227 Danilo Borja; Juan Bay; Conny Davidsen; Traducido por Yulia Garcia Sarduy (2021).
Ancianos amazónicos en la frontera petrolera: La vida y muerte de Nenkihui Bay, líder tradicional Waorani
Journal of Latin American Geography 20(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/787933

2107 Diana Vela-Almeida; Sofia Zaragocin; Manuel Bayón; Iñigo Arrazola (2020).
Imaginando territorios plurales de vida: una lectura feminista de las resistencias en los movimientos socio-territoriales en el Ecuador
Journal of Latin American Geography 19(2). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/749633

1610 Geobrujas-Comunidad de Geógrafas (2021).
Cuerpos, fronteras y resistencia: mujeres conjurando geografí­a a través de experiencias desde el otro lado del muro
Journal of Latin American Geography 20(2). https://muse.jhu.edu/article/799599

1532 Colectivo de Geografía Crítica del Ecuador (2017).
Geografiando para la resistencia
Journal of Latin American Geography 16(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/653095

1512 Diego B. Leal; David S. Salisbury; Josué Faquín Fernández; Lizardo Cauper Pezo; Julio Silva (2015).
Ideas cambiantes sobre territorio, recursos y redes políticas en la Amazonía indígena: un estudio de caso sobre Perú
Journal of Latin American Geography 14(2). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/586857

1353 Christian Abizaid; Luis Ángel Collado Panduro; Sergio Gonzales Egusquiza (2020).
Pobreza Y Medios De Subsistencia En La Amazonía Peruana En Tiempos De La Covid-19
Journal of Latin American Geography 19(3). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/760940

1186 Jerónimo Ríos Sierra (2020).
Una aproximación (geo)politológica a la crisis de la COVID-19 en América Latina
Journal of Latin American Geography 19(3). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/760939

931 Robert B. Kent (2012).
La geografía en América Latina: Visión por países
Journal of Latin American Geography 11(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/470642

812 Rosa Silvia Arciniega (2012).
Participación de Mujeres en el Mercado Laboral del Estado de México
Journal of Latin American Geography 11(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/470633

Os Artigos Português Mais Populares da JLAG por Solicitações Desde 2010

1672 Rogério Haesbaert (2020).
Território(s) numa perspectiva latino-americana
Journal of Latin American Geography 19(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/744032

1565 Luciene Cristina Risso; Clerisnaldo Rodrigues de Carvalho (2022).
A exibição de antipolíticas indígenas e ambientais orquestrada pelo governo brasileiro de Bolsonaro
Journal of Latin American Geography 21(2). https://muse.jhu.edu/article/863335

1268 Joana Salém Vasconcelos (2021).
Cuba, protestos e caminhos da revolução
Journal of Latin American Geography 20(3). https://muse.jhu.edu/article/835650

765 Laura Sarmiento (2016).
JLAG Perspectives: Vida, Conhecimento e Território: uma geobiografia do Carlos Walter Porto-Gonçalves
Journal of Latin American Geography 15(3). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/639102

729 Joseli Maria Silva; Marcio Jose Ornat (2020).
Geografias feministas na América Latina: desafios epistemológicos e a decolonialidade de saberes
Journal of Latin American Geography 19(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/744044

389 Jessica Budds; Martha G. Bell; John C. Finn; Jörn Seemann; Eugenio Arima; Gabriela Valdivia (2023).
Language, Translation, and the Practice of Decolonizing Academic Publishing / Lengua, traducción y la práctica de la descolonización de las publicaciones académicas / Linguagem, tradução e a prática de descolonização das publicações acadêmicas
Journal of Latin American Geography 22(2). https://muse.jhu.edu/article/909083

282 Christian Dennys Monteiro de Oliveira; Fabrício Américo Ribeiro; Ivo Luis Oliveira Silva; Luiz Raphael Teixeira Silva; José Arilson Xavier de Souza; Gerlaine Cristina Franco; Marcos da Silva Rocha; Maryvone Moura Gomes; Camila Benatti (2020).
As organizações religiosas brasileiras frente à pandemia de COVID-19
Journal of Latin American Geography 19(3). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/760909

212 Vinicius Santos Almeida (2020).
Necromobilidade durante a pandemia da Covid-19
Journal of Latin American Geography 19(3). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/760907

160 Antoinette M.G.A. WinklerPrins (2009).
Cidades da Floresta: Urbanização, Desenvolvimento, e Globalização na Amazônia Brasileira (review)
Journal of Latin American Geography 8(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/260547

121 Jean-Yves Puyo (2008).
Mise en valeur de la Guyane française et peuplement blanc: les espoirs déçus du baron de Laussat (1819-1823)
Journal of Latin American Geography 7(1). http://muse.jhu.edu/article/232499

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