Organize Session – Guatemala 2020

If you want to organize a session, please use the CLAG listserve to make calls for papers.  Once you have a complete session (five papers each, or four papers and an discussant) please e-mail me at m.j.taylor@du.edu with the session title and a list of the participants.  Encourage your session participants to submit their abstracts as instructed here.

Matthew Taylor
Professor and Graduate Director

Department of Geography and the Environment
University of Denver
2050 East Iliff Avenue
Denver, 80208
phone: 303 871 2656

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CLAG 2020 - Organizar una Sesión

Si quiere organizer una sesión, por favor usar CLAGnet para hacer un llamado de ponencias.  Al tener una sesión completa (5 ponencias, o 4 ponencias y un comentarista), por favor mande un corréo a m.j.taylor@du.edu con el título de la sesión y un listado de los participantes.  Los participantes tendrán que enviar sus resúmenes  siguiendo las instrucciones aquí.

Matthew Taylor
Professor and Graduate Director

Department of Geography and the Environment
University of Denver
2050 East Iliff Avenue
Denver, 80208
phone: 303 871 2656

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Example Abstract / Ejemplo de Resumen:

Kendra McSweeney

Department of Geography

The Ohio State University

FROM PORTRAIT TO LANDSCAPE: USING PHOTOGRAPHS TO ACCESS LOCAL PERCEPTIONS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE IN EASTERN HONDURAS

The success of local-outsider collaboration in managing biodiverse landscapes depends in large part on how much different groups’ perceptions of environmental change—its trajectory and the urgency of its mitigation—converge.  Recent research has questioned whether such convergence exists.  This paper examines how dissonance in perception of environmental change might arise from local peoples’ distinctive collective memories of past events, and their conceptualization of time more generally.  Research was conducted in eastern Honduras, where Tawahka Amerindians are working with national and international NGOs to manage a new Biosphere Reserve.  70-year old photographs of Tawahka ancestors were used to elicit local views of resource use change. Resultant discussions revealed surprising accounts of local history, and an unexpected view of the role that North Americans play as keepers of the landscape’s past.  Findings suggest that closer attention to local notions of long-term environmental change in conservation-and-development initiatives.

Keywords: environmental change, photographs in fieldwork, conservation and development, Tawahka, Honduras, Latin America.

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