Submit Abstract – Guatemala 2020

The final date for registration and abstract submission at the regular rate is OCTOBER 20 2019

Paper and poster abstract submission open for Antigua 2020!

Conference abstract submission is now open for Antigua 2020! Please submit abstracts by October 20.

  1. Please submit abstracts to m.j.taylor@du.edu
  2. In the subject line of the email please put “your name: CLAG 2020 ABSTRACT” followed by the word “poster" or "paper” – choose one depending on your intended presentation type.
  3. In the body of the email please include your abstract.   Please follow the example below from a previous CLAG conference

Matthew Taylor
Professor and Graduate Director

Department of Geography and the Environment
University of Denver
2050 East Iliff Avenue
Denver, 80208
phone: 303 871 2656

____________________

La última fecha para inscribirse y para enviar resúmenes sin costos adicionales será el 20 de octubre

Entrega de resúmenes para artículos y posters abierta para Antigua 2020!

La entrega de resúmenes para CLAG 2020 en Antigua ya está abierta. Por favor mandar sus resumenes antes de 20 de octubre.

  1. Mande su resúmen a m.j.taylor@du.edu
  2. En el sujeto de su correo por favor pongan “nombre: CLAG 2020 RESUMEN” seguido por “poster" o "articulo” según el tipo de su presentación
  3. En el corréo, por favor, siga el formato siguiendo el ejemplo abajo (de una conferencia anterior de CLAG).

Matthew Taylor
Professor and Graduate Director

Department of Geography and the Environment
University of Denver
2050 East Iliff Avenue
Denver, 80208
phone: 303 871 2656

____________________

Example Abstract / Ejemplo de Resumen:

Kendra McSweeney

Department of Geography

The Ohio State University

FROM PORTRAIT TO LANDSCAPE: USING PHOTOGRAPHS TO ACCESS LOCAL PERCEPTIONS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE IN EASTERN HONDURAS

The success of local-outsider collaboration in managing biodiverse landscapes depends in large part on how much different groups’ perceptions of environmental change—its trajectory and the urgency of its mitigation—converge.  Recent research has questioned whether such convergence exists.  This paper examines how dissonance in perception of environmental change might arise from local peoples’ distinctive collective memories of past events, and their conceptualization of time more generally.  Research was conducted in eastern Honduras, where Tawahka Amerindians are working with national and international NGOs to manage a new Biosphere Reserve.  70-year old photographs of Tawahka ancestors were used to elicit local views of resource use change. Resultant discussions revealed surprising accounts of local history, and an unexpected view of the role that North Americans play as keepers of the landscape’s past.  Findings suggest that closer attention to local notions of long-term environmental change in conservation-and-development initiatives.

Keywords: environmental change, photographs in fieldwork, conservation and development, Tawahka, Honduras, Latin America.

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